Finales: Re:Creators and Isekai Shokudou, and PP 11

There wasn’t much for Re:Creators 22 to do once they got rid of the threat. Everybody says wise words to their creator or creation, the latter insisting that their god will give them the justice or boyfriend they want, and off they go, except for Meteora, partly because she can’t cast the portal spell and use it herself, and partly because she likes it here. Now powerless, she gets a new identity and proceeds to do what she admired about the creators, that is, create something. We see billboards and posters advertising their further adventures (Aliceteria and Mamika in a crossover full of flowers and stuff). I wonder if the stories will get deadly dull since the creators might not have the will to kill their darlings anymore. Suruga is the only one to tell her creation that his life will continue to be nasty. Apart from a couple nice bits (Selesia appearing in an ad on Souta’s phone) it was just as dull as I expected.

The show managed some good self-referential lines up to the end.

What about Magane? The finale completely ignores her. I partly don’t mind because I never liked the character, but to not have her show up, unless she sneaked in somewhere I didn’t notice, felt wrong. The creators in this show seemed to lose control or interest the farther the series went. The first few episodes weren’t like that. The idea of fictional characters entering or own isn’t new, but they managed to do interesting things with it. The different genres duking it out on more or less equal terms was good, and they asked solid questions about what the creators and the creations would do in the situation. I’ve always liked the father/daughter relationship between Matsubura and Selesia, and the bonding that boy pilot Rui and delinquent Yuya do. The setup was fascinating and the show strode confidently forward, tossing out ideas each episode.

But after that they seemed to find themselves in a hole. Meteora, the most eloquent of the creations, was stuck in that booth chanting cult-babble and casting spells. Altair, while full of murderous intent throughout, wound up doing little more than muttering evil things and snickering. The other creations all became more and more irrelevant (apart from the nice twist for Blitz). What was Hikayu supposed to be doing there, anyway, apart from comic relief? Why did Matsubura show so little shock at Selesia’s death, well, until it was all over? It’s a shame. The show had a lot of promise and often lived up to it, but by the end I was indifferent.

One more of Selesia, alive somewhere.
Wait, but YOU’RE Princess, well, not really anymore, but …

Princess Principal had spent most of its time dilly-dallying in little spy games, stealing plans here, offing people there, none of it of much consequence to the overall conflict between East and West, but I’ll admit that the two-parter that will close the season is a tasty one. We already know that the girls are to kill the princess, and suddenly Ange finds that all of her comrades have been transferred, or have just vanished (chilling reference to the spy school last episode), and Control is now run by the military. Ange makes plans to run off with Princess, but the latter refuses, accuses Ange of trying to run her life for her, and escapes, leaving Ange locked on that airship going to Casablanca, I assume. She reappears as Ange disguised as Princess, mission accomplished, and meets some colony soldiers who are going to revolt.

Except, you aren’t, but you are, but … oh, forget it. Like the glasses though.

It’s a fun twist. First, the plotters think they’re talking to a girl who is pretending to be Princess, when actually, this is the Princess everyone knows, except, Princess from the start is actually a girl pretending to be Princess! Good thing they didn’t have DNA tests in 1872 (though they DO have cars …). I’m also pleased that this bunch of soldiers will actually escalate the war the way I was hoping the series would from the start. But how are they going to polish this off in one episode? Well, the other girls might be gone, but I can’t believe they’re not going to appear again, especially Dorothy. Chise gets some info that might be useful, maybe, somehow, perhaps. And what is Princess going to do? The other problem is that her mother the Queen’s life is now in danger (okay, not her real mother …). Is she going to follow along with the revolt, become queen, and then act as a figurehead for those men and have THEM run her life? And of course, what about Ange and her relationship with Princess? No, too much to fit into one episode. They should have started sooner.

There’s a bit of mystery solved, in case anyone cares.

Isekai Shokudou finishes the season without fanfare, no special episode or plot twists that put the restaurant in danger or anything like that, and I’m relieved about that. We do learn that the chef is the great-grandson of a great warrior who was hurled onto this world after an epic battle, something Altorious alone knew. That bit’s a bit clumsy, especially with Alexander the elf’s family connections thrown in. Never mind, it’s just a little surprise that changes nothing. Far more important is the complementary pork soup (It’s Meat Day!) that just about every patron tries and loves, of course. The customers love everything the chef puts out for them, and rarely do they stray from the foods they eat when they first visit. Lack of imagination there, but I’ll let it slide because this show was about people eating food; everything else, including the equally unimaginative fantasy setting, was secondary. The only other quibble I have is that they could have brought the politics of that world into the restaurant more than they did. I would have liked to see some enemies or rivals share a meal of croquettes or whatever. Sadly, the various customers didn’t often chat up any of the other, strange people there. Well, as I said, it was a nice little show about the pleasures of eating, and it was a pleasant way to spend a half hour.

One more of Aletta, who’s actually happier than she looks.

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